Labor-Related Laws

The following is a list of labor-related laws in the Philippines.

1. Concept

Labor-related laws – refer to laws that regulate or affect labor and employment.

Labor-related laws include:

1) Laws specifically designed for labor and employment, and

2) Laws which are designed for non-labor and employment purposes but nonetheless have a few legal provisions which affect employment.

a. Laws specifically designed for labor and employment

The following are examples of laws specifically designed for labor and employment:

PD 442 – Labor Code of the Philippines – This is a Labor Law specifically designed for labor and employment, as it provides for legal provisions on statutory monetary benefits, employment contracts, due process, to name a few.

RA 8187 – Paternity Leave Act of 1996 (as amended by RA 11210) – This is a Labor Law specifically designed for labor and employment, as it provides for legal provisions on granting covered employees with paternity leave credits.

RA 11210 – 105 Day Expanded Maternity Leave Law – This is a Labor Law specifically designed for labor and employment, as it provides for legal provisions on granting covered employees with maternity leave credits.

Here are some of the rest:

RA 11227 – Handbook for OFWs Act of 2018

RA 11210 – 105 Day Expanded Maternity Leave Law

RA 11165 – Telecommuting Act

RA 10911 – Anti-age Discrimination In Employment Act

RA 10361 – Batas Kasambahay

RA 10022 – An Act Amending R.A. 8042

RA 8187 – Paternity Leave Act of 1996 (as amended by RA 11210)

RA 8042 – Migrant Workers and Overseas Filipinos Act of 1995 (as amended by RA 10022)

RA 7699 – Portability Law

RA 6971 – Productivity Incentives Act of 1990

RA 6727 – Wage Rationalization Act

RA 6725 – Amending Article 135 of the Labor Code, Re: Prohibition on Discrimination Against • Women

RA 6715 – New Labor Relations Law

PD 851 – 13th Month Pay Law

PD 626 – Amending Certain Articles of the Labor Code

PD 442 – Labor Code of the Philippines

b. Laws which are designed for non-labor and employment purposes but nonetheless have a few legal provisions which affect employment

The following are examples of laws specifically designed for labor and employment:

RA 386 – Civil Code of the Philippines – This is primarily a Civil Law as it contains provisions on persons and human relations, family and succession, obligations and contracts. However, it also contains a few legal provisions affecting employment contracts.

RA 7877 – Anti-Sexual Harassment Act of 1995 – This is primarily a Criminal Law as it penalizes those who are involved in sexual harassment. However, it also contains a few legal provisions on the duties and responsibilities of the employer to avoid such offenses being committed at the workplace, such as coming up with Anti-Sexual Harassment Workplace Policies.

RA 9165 – Dangerous Drugs Act – This is primarily a Criminal Law as it penalizes those who are involved in dangerous drugs. However, it also contains a few legal provisions on the duties and responsibilities of the employer to avoid such offenses being committed at the workplace, such as coming up with Drug-Free Workplace Policies.

RA 8282 – SSS Law and RA 8291 – GSIS Law – These are primarily Administrative Laws as they provide for the creation of the administrative agencies Social Security Agency and the Government Service Insurance System., both of which collect mandatory contributions from private employees and public employees.

Here are some of the rest:

RA 11223 – Universal Health Care Act

RA 10361 – Batas Kasambahay

RA 9710 – Magna Carta of Women

RA 9262 – Anti-Violence Against Women and Their Children Act of 2004

RA 9208 – Anti-Trafficking in Persons Act of 2003 (as amended by R.A. 10364)

RA 9165 – Dangerous Drugs Act (as amended)

RA 8972 – Solo Parents’ Welfare Act (as amended by RA 11210)

RA 8291 – GSIS Law

RA 8282 – SSS Law

RA 7877 – Anti-Sexual Harassment Act of 1995

RA 7610 – Special Protection of Children Against Abuse, Exploitation and Discrimination Act (as amended by RA 9231)

RA 386 – Civil Code of the Philippines

/Updated: August 19, 2023